Jason Fung

The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss

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Thomas Munk Christensenhas quoted2 years ago
The second lie, according to Dr. Fung, is our belief that type 2 diabetes is a disease of abnormal blood glucose levels for which the only correct treatment is progressively increasing insulin dosages. He argues, instead, that type 2 diabetes is a disease of insulin resistance with excessive insulin secretion—in contrast to type 1 diabetes, a condition of true insulin lack. To treat both conditions the same way—by injecting insulin—makes no sense. Why treat a condition of insulin excess with yet more insulin, he asks? That is the equivalent of prescribing alcohol for the treatment of alcoholism.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted5 months ago
balance insulin-dominant periods with insulin-deficient periods: balance your feeding and fasting. Eating continuously is a recipe for weight gain. Intermittent fasting is a very effective way to deal with when to eat. In the end, the question is this: If you don’t eat, will you lose weight? Yes, of course. So there is no real doubt about its efficacy. It will work.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Heart attacks and strokes are predominantly inflammatory diseases, rather than simply diseases of high cholesterol levels.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Blood glucose accounts for only 23 percent of the insulin response. Dietary fats and protein only accounts for another 10 percent. Close to 67 percent of the insulin response is still unknown—which is tantalizingly close to the 70 percent contribution to obesity that is inherited
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Animal protein is highly variable but comes with the protective effect of satiety. And we shouldn’t ignore the protective power of the incretin effect. The slowing of gastric motility increases satiety so that we feel more full and therefore eat less at the next meal, or even skip a meal altogether to allow ourselves “time to digest.”
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
The cephalic phase is another pathway of insulin secretion independent of glucose. The body anticipates food as soon as it goes in your mouth and long before nutrients hit the stomach. For example, swishing a sucrose or saccharin solution around your mouth and spitting it out will increase your insulin level.7
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
They targeted the glucose response with the assumption that insulin mirrored glucose. But this is not the case. You could lower the glucose response, but you didn’t necessarily lower the insulin response. In the end, the insulin response is what matters.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Insulin can increase independently of blood sugar.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
The insulin index, created by Susanne Holt in 1997, measures the rise in insulin in response to a standard portion of food, and it turns out to be quite different from the glycemic index.2
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
High carbohydrate intake increases insulin, and insulin stimulates the kidney to reabsorb water. Lowering insulin therefore causes excretion of the excess water.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
nsulin causes obesity. The goal should therefore be to lower insulin levels—not glucose levels. The unspoken assumption is that glucose is the only stimulant to insulin secretion. This turns out not to be true at all. There are many factors that raise and lower insulin, especially protein
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Soluble fiber reduces carbohydrate absorption, which in turn reduces blood glucose and insulin levels.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
One study demonstrated that a low-fiber diet resulted in 8 percent higher caloric absorption.7 In short, fiber may decrease food intake, slow down food’s absorption in the stomach and small intestine, then help it exit quickly through the large intestines—all of which are potentially beneficial in treating obesity.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Cocaine users will know that very fine powders are absorbed into the bloodstream much faster than coarse grains—that’s what allows for higher “highs,” both for cocaine and for glucose. Refined wheat causes our glucose levels to spike. Insulin levels follow.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Sucrose, a fifty-fifty mix of glucose and fructose, therefore plays a dual role in obesity. Glucose is a refined carbohydrate that directly stimulates insulin. Fructose overconsumption causes fatty liver, which directly produces insulin resistance. Over the longer term, insulin resistance also leads to increased insulin levels, which then feeds back to increase insulin resistance.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
? Because we are now marinating our children in insulin starting in the womb, they develop more severe obesity sooner than ever before.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
The government is subsidizing, with our own tax dollars, the very foods that are making us obese. Obesity is effectively the result of government policy
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Insulin resistance is Lex Luthor. It is the hidden force behind most of modern medicine’s archenemies, including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. But while Lex Luthor is fictional, the insulin resistance syndrome, also called the metabolic syndrome, is not.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Consider some typical comfort foods. Macaroni and cheese. Pasta. Ice cream. Apple pie. Mashed potatoes. Pancakes. Notice anything? All are highly refined carbohydrates. There is evidence that these foods activate the reward systems in our brains, which gives us “comfort.” Refined carbohydrates are easy to become addicted to and overeat precisely because there are no natural satiety hormones for refined carbs. The reason, of course, is that refined carbohydrates are not natural foods but are instead highly processed. Their toxicity lies in that processing.
Daniela Orozcohas quoted6 months ago
Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric obesity specialist, believes that high insulin levels act as an inhibitor of leptin, the hormone that signals satiety. Leptin levels increase with body fat. This response acts on the hypothalamus in a negative feedback loop to decrease food intake and return the body to its ideal weight. However, because the brain becomes leptin resistant due to constant exposure, it does not reduce its signal to gain fat.
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