Digital Tarkovsky, Metahaven
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Digital Tarkovsky

Svyatoslav Yushin
Svyatoslav Yushinhas quoted2 years ago
If that is the case, you are not alone. It is reported that in the US alone, the average adult spends two hours and 51 minutes on their smartphone every day.
kolozaridi
kolozaridihas quoted2 years ago
Tarkovsky forces us to experience the fact that things take time.
Ploy Oratai
Ploy Orataihas quoted3 months ago
“If it were possible to demonstrate that lived reality is always a construct of the imagination and thus perceived only on condition of being fictional, irreducibly haunted by phantasms, then we would finally be forced to conclude that perception is subordinated to — is in a transductive relationship with — the imagination; that is, there would be no perception outside imagination, and vice versa, perception then being the imagination’s projection screen. The relationship between the two would be constituted of previously non-existent terms, and this in turn would mean that life is always cinema [...].”

— Bernard Stiegler
Ploy Oratai
Ploy Orataihas quoted3 months ago
One cannot, for instance, put actual time together with conceptual time, any more than one can join water pipes of different diameters.” T
Ploy Oratai
Ploy Orataihas quoted3 months ago
Interior. Day. You are waiting for her or him in the cafe, that just opened. You are early. You are waiting to have the difficult conversation with her or him. The music “My Girl” by Otis Redding, echoing through the empty space, comes exactly at the wrong moment. Because it’s so beautiful. Because it reminds you of what matters most: acceptance. Forgiveness. Because it reminds you of things as they are rather than how you would like them to be. So it reminds you of the person you should be. Worse even: the person you once were and should have remained. Retrieve your former self before it’s too late. Nobody could ever live up to promises that were the sole creation of expectations by others. Nobody could ever live up to your expectations. Tears start rolling from your eyes. Instead of waiting for her or him at the bar, you leave, and send them a message: “Sorry, I’m a bit late.”
Ploy Oratai
Ploy Orataihas quoted3 months ago
For Besso’s family, their loved one was gone. To physics, this may have meant little. but to human existence, it meant a world of difference. Time had an arrow: Besso’s body would irreversibly disintegrate. He would not come back.
Ploy Oratai
Ploy Orataihas quoted3 months ago
Since duration has no direction, it could potentially be uncoupled from cause-and-effect relationships like the falling resulting in the breaking. In other words, it should theoretically be possible to create an unrealistic, and yet life-like cinematic experience of time flowing in a direction other than forward.
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
The platform’s user interface is sticky. For that reason, its features, including “autoplay, endless scroll, reverse chronological timelines, and push notifications,” were, as Elizabeth Stinson reminds us, “once heralded as frictionless, user-friendly design.” But these design features are also increasingly called out as manipulative.
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
Instead, on platforms, the term “FOMO,” or “Fear Of Missing Out,” is listed as one of the primary negative emotions experienced by users who frequently use Instagram, which has been dubbed the “worst social media for mental health
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
Schrader argues that transcendental style has separated itself from mainstream film and formed a separate genre of slow cinema. The ultimate outcomes, says Schrader, will now be “surveillance cameras, art galleries, and mandalas
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
Indeed, Dyer finds a citation from Flaubert that “could have come straight from Tarkovsky’s diaries”:
“‘From the standpoint of pure art, one might establish the axiom that there is no such thing as a subject — style in itself being an absolute manner of seeing things
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
Will Self comments that in a digital age “our ability to produce suspension of disbelief is greater than our suspension of disbelief. Our capacity to produce images of high fidelity is greater than our capacity to see them
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
Post-continuity stylistics are expressive both of technological changes (i.e. the rise of digital and internet-based media) and of more general social, economic, and political conditions (i.e. globalized neoliberal capitalism, and the intensified financialization associated with it). Like any other stylistic norm, post-continuity involves films of the greatest diversity in terms of their interests, commitments, and aesthetic values. What unites them, however, is not just a bunch of techniques and formal tics, but a kind of shared episteme (Michel Foucault) or structure of feeling (Raymond Williams
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
i]n recent action blockbusters by the likes of Michael Bay and Tony Scott, there no longer seems to be any concern for delineating the geography of action, by clearly anchoring it in time and space. Instead, gunfights, martial arts battles, and car chases are rendered through sequences involving shaky handheld cameras, extreme or even impossible camera angles, and much composited digital material — all stitched together with rapid cuts, frequently involving deliberately mismatched shots.”
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
“[t]he easier it becomes to counterfeit an image, as political propaganda for instance, the more difficult it is to convince someone that an image is real. As computer graphics get better, we believe all images less.”
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
One might say that the prosthetic hand has achieved a degree of resemblance to the human form… However, when we realize the hand, which at first sight looked real, is in fact artificial, we experience an eerie sensation. For example, we could be startled during a handshake by its limp, boneless grip together with its texture and coldness. When this happens, we lose our sense of affinity, and the hand becomes uncanny. In mathematical terms, this can be represented by a negative value. Therefore, in this case, the appearance of the prosthetic hand is quite human-like, but the level of affinity is negative, thus placing the hand near the bottom of the valley...This example illustrates the uncanny valley phenomenon
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
In the words of Lev Manovich, it is moving “from Kino-Eye to Kino-Brush.” [17] The Kino-Eye refers to a filmmaking concept of the avant-garde Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov, in which he wanted the camera to surpass the human gaze. The Kino-Brush, then, is the digital paint brush that opens up every image to fabrication, manipulation, and painterly creation. As Manovich points out, all digital moving images are made of the same electronic points, the smallest addressable elements in a raster. “The computer,” he stresses, “does not distinguish between an image obtained through the photographic lens, an image created in a paint program, or an image synthesized in a 3D graphics package, since they are made from the same material — pixels. And pixels, regardless of their origin, can be easily altered, one substituted for another, and so on. Live-action footage is reduced to just another graphic, no different from images that were created manually
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
Ironically, in most “cinematic” camera and lens comparison videos, extremely mundane things — like streets, buildings, and fountains — are filmed in order to compare the technical prowess of various tools
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
When, in 1886, 175 countries signed the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, Russia was not among them. According to Neigel, this was due to three main reasons:
First, and most importantly, signing the Convention would have resulted in huge costs to the Russian government. Because Russia was a prolific consumer of foreign literature, it would have been obligated to pay royalties to Convention members. Second, the Russian government regarded the Convention as a device to protect the interests of publishers while ignoring the interests of authors and the greater society. Finally, adherence to the Convention would have forced the Russian government to abolish its policy of free translation. The Russian government relied on freedom of translation to disseminate creative works to its multilingual population
Anatolik Belikov
Anatolik Belikovhas quoted3 months ago
[56] Within Soviet culture from 1960 onwards, intellectual pursuits towards imaginary outsides began to be formed. These were composed of “foreign languages and Asian philosophy, medieval poetry and Hemingway’s novels, astronomy and science fiction, avant-garde jazz and songs about pirates, practices of hiking, mountaineering, and going on geological expeditions in the remote nature reserves of Siberia, the Far East, and the North.” [57] The Zone, then, “did not imply any concrete ‘real’ territory; it referred to a certain imaginary space that was simultaneously internal and external to late-socialist reality.”
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