Virginia Woolf

A Writer's Diary (1918 - 1941) - Complete edition

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    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    I enjoy almost everything. Yet I have some restless searcher in me. Why is there not a discovery in life? Something one can lay hands on and say ‘This is it’? My depression is a harassed feeling. I’m looking: but that’s not it—that’s not it. What is it? And shall I die before I find it? Then (as I was walking through Russell Square last night) I see the mountains in the sky: the great clouds; and the moon which is risen over Persia; I have a great and astonishing sense of something there, which is ‘it’. It is not exactly beauty that I mean. It is that the thing is in itself enough: satisfactory; achieved. A sense of my own strangeness, walking on the earth is there too: of the infinite oddity of the human position; trotting along Russell Square with the moon up there and those mountain clouds. Who am I, what am I, and so on: these questions are always floating about in me: and then I bump against some exact fact—a letter, a person, and come to them again with a great sense of freshness. And so it goes on. But on this showing, which is true, I think, I do fairly frequently come upon this ‘it’; and then feel quite at rest.
    caglakurtxhas quoted2 years ago
    I shall be attacked for a feminist and hinted at for a Sapphist;

    Sybil will ask me to luncheon; I shall get a good many letters from young women. I am afraid it will not be taken seriously. Mrs Woolf is so accomplished a writer that all she says makes easy reading … this very feminine logic … a book to be put in the hands of girls.
    caglakurtxhas quoted2 years ago
    good or bad I have just set the last correction to Women and Fiction, or A Room of One’s Own. I shall never read it again I suppose. Good or bad? Has an uneasy life in it I think: you feel the creature arching its back and galloping on, though as usual much is watery and flimsy and pitched in too high a voice.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    She stayed from Tuesday to Sunday night, to be exact: and almost had me down. Why? Because (partly) she has the artist’s temperament without being an artist. She’s temperamental, but has no outlet. I find her charming: individual: honest and somehow pathetic. Her curious obtusity, her staleness of mind, is perceptible to her. And she hesitates. Ought one to make up? Y. says yes—I say no. The truth is she has no instinct for colour: no more than for music or pictures. A great deal of force and spirit and yet always at the leap something balks her.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    Incessant company is as bad as solitary confinement.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    A terrible state of display and ugliness—but she was so nice and unexpected I actually asked her to come and see us—which, had she known it, is a compliment we never pay even the royal family.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    It is all very well, saying one will write notes, but writing is a very difficult art.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    How am I to get the depth without becoming static?
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    I am in danger, indeed, of becoming our leading novelist, and not with the highbrows only.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    What is the use of saying one is indifferent to reviews when positive praise, though mingled with blame, gives one such a start on, that instead of feeling dried up, one feels, on the contrary, flooded with ideas?
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    I am frightfully contented these last few days, by the way. I don’t quite understand it.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    Yesterday I heard from Harcourt Brace that Mrs D. and C.R. are selling 148 and 73 weekly—isn’t that a surprising rate for the fourth month? Doesn’t it portend a bathroom and a w.c., either here or Southease? I am writing in the watery blue sunset, the repentance of an ill tempered morose day, which vanished, the clouds, I have no doubt, showing gold over the downs, and leaving a soft gold fringe on the top there.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    A feeling of depression is on me, as if we were old and near the end of all things.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    I should graze nearer my own individuality.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    We agreed that people are now afraid of the English language. He said it came of being bookish, but not reading books enough.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    Where is my paper knife? I must cut Lord Byron.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    He said that many men marry in order to have a wife to boast to. But, I said, it’s odd that one boasts considering that no one is ever taken in by it.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    I don’t take praise or blame excessively to heart, but they interrupt, cast one’s—eyes backwards, make one wish to explain or investigate.
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    It seems to me more and more clear that the only honest people are the artists, and that these social reformers and philanthropists get so out of hand and harbour so many discreditable desires under the disguise of loving their kind, that in the end there’s more to find fault with in them than in us. But if I were one of them?
    Said Sadikhovhas quoted5 years ago
    Yet, if one is to deal with people on a large scale and say what one thinks, how can one avoid melancholy?
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