Dan Ariely

The Upside of Irrationality

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njjjjhgyjhas quoted2 years ago
Accordingly, the daily DECISIONS we make while we’re upset or annoyed (or happy) may have an even larger impact on our future DECISIONS.
njjjjhgyjhas quoted2 years ago
The most practical news is this: if we do nothing while we are feeling an emotion, there is no short- or long-term harm that can come to us.
njjjjhgyjhas quoted2 years ago
ONE APPROACH IS to follow the advice given to addicts: that the first step in overcoming any addiction is recognizing the problem.
njjjjhgyjhas quoted2 years ago
The opposite holds if you are struggling with economic cutbacks. When reducing consumption, you should move to a smaller apartment, give up cable television, and cut back on expensive coffee all at once—sure, the initial pain will be larger, but the total amount of agony over time will be lower.
Ramon Verduzco-olivahas quoted5 months ago
We are usually quick to assume that there is a link between the magnitude of the incentive and the ability to perform better. It seems reasonable that the more motivated we are to achieve something, the harder we will work to reach our goal, and that this increased effort will ultimately move us closer to our objective.
Ramon Verduzco-olivahas quoted10 months ago
spend some time thinking about how the principles of human behavior apply to your life and consider what you might do differently, given your new understanding of human nature. That is where the real adventure lies.
layanosanihas quotedlast year
incentives can be a double-edged sword. Up to a certain point, they motivate us to learn and perform well. But beyond that point, motivational pressure can be so high that it actually distracts an individual from concentrating on and carrying out a task—an undesirable outcome for anyone.
layanosanihas quotedlast year
Following this logic we would assume that when the rats really wanted to avoid the most intense shocks, they would learn the fastest
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
This means that before committing to any long-term relationship you should first explore your joint behavior in environments that don’t have well-defined social protocols (for example, I think that couples should plan their weddings before they decide to marry and go ahead with the marriage only if they still like each other).
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
So if you’re half of a couple, what happens when you go canoeing? Do you or your partner start blaming each other every time the canoe seems to misbehave (“Didn’t you see that rock?”)? Do you get into a huge battle that ends with one or both of you jumping overboard, swimming to shore, and not speaking for an hour? Or, when you hit a rock, do you work together trying to figure out who should do what, and get along as best you can?*
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
Whenever I go canoeing, I see couples arguing as they unintentionally run aground or get hung up on a rock. Canoeing looks easier than it is, and that may be why it quickly brings couples to the brink of battle. Arguments occur far less frequently when I meet a couple for drinks or go to their home for dinner, and it isn’t just because they are trying to be on their best behavior (after all, why wouldn’t a couple also try to be on good behavior on the river?). I think it has to do with the well-established patterns of behavior people have for their normal, day-to-day activities (arguing vehemently at the table in front of strangers is pretty much a no-no in most families).

But when you’re on a river, the situation is largely new. There isn’t a clear protocol. The river is unpredictable, and canoes tend to drift and turn in ways you don’t anticipate. (This situation is very much like life, which is full of new and surprising stresses and roadblocks.) There’s also a fuzzy kind of division of labor between the front and back (or bow and stern, if you want to be technical). This context offers plenty of opportunities to establish and observe fresh patterns of behavior.
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
The most practical news is this: if we do nothing while we are feeling an emotion, there is no short- or long-term harm that can come to us. However, if we react to the emotion by making a DECISION, we may not only regret the immediate outcome, but we may also create a long-lasting pattern of DECISIONS that will continue to misguide us for a long time. Finally, we’ve also learned that our tendency toward self-herding kicks into gear not only when we make the same kinds of DECISIONS but also when we make “neighboring” ones.
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
Our immediate decisions don’t just affect what’s happening at the moment; they can also affect a long sequence of related decisions far into our future.
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
decisions we make over and over. But the influence of the general version of self-herding suggests that decisions we make on the basis of a momentary emotion can also influence related choices and decisions in other domains even long after the original DECISION is made
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
the ultimatum game is associated with activation in the anterior insula—a part of the brain associated with negative emotional experience
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
many studies in behavioral economics have shown that people make decisions based on a sense of fairness and justice. People get angry over unfairness, and, as a consequence, they prefer to lose some money in order to punish the person making the unfair offer
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
emotional cascade. I don’t know about you, but I find the notion that our DECISIONS can remain hostage to emotions long after the emotions have passed rather frightening.
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
We call this type of process self-herding, because it is similar to the way we follow others but instead we follow our own past behavior
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
According to the Talmud, “whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved an entire world
Артем Малахивскийhas quoted2 years ago
All of these reasons are why Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth relied so heavily on images of drowning polar bears and other vivid imagery; they were his way of tapping into our emotions
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