Rhena Branch,Rob Willson

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Dummies

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    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    CBT involves identifying thoughts, beliefs, and meanings that are activated when you’re feeling emotionally disturbed. If you assign less extreme, more helpful, more accurate meanings to negative events, you are likely to experience less extreme, less disturbing emotional and behavioural responses
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    The main point is to be able to analyse your thoughts and behaviours, and to take notice of where your attention is focused
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Concentration exercise: Taking a walk
    For this exercise, walk through a park, paying attention to what you hear, see, feel, and smell. Focus your attention for a few minutes on different aspects of the world around you. First, focus your attention mainly to what you can hear. Then shift your attention to focus on smells, and then on to the feel of your feet on the ground, and so on
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Task concentration involves paying less attention to what’s going on inside of you and more attention to what’s happening outside of you
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    For the most part, your thoughts, no matter how distressing and negative, are not the real problem. Rather, the importance or meaning you attach to those thoughts is what causes you the problem
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    A crucial step in CBT is to make the thought–feeling link or B-to-C connection; that is, seeing clearly for yourself the connection between what goes through your mind and your resulting emotions. When you see this connection, it can help you to make much more sense of why to challenge and change your thoughts.
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    become aware of patterns or themes in the kinds of situations or events that trigger your negative thoughts. These can also help you to focus on the areas in which your thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes need most work
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Figuring out which thinking errors you tend to make the most can be a useful way of making your CBT self-help more efficient and effective. The simplest way of doing this is to jot down your thoughts whenever you feel upset and note what was happening at the time
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Telling yourself you can’t stand something has two effects. First, it leads you to focus more on the discomfort you’re experiencing. Second, it leads you to underestimate your ability to cope with discomfort
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    If you only ever take in information that fits with the way you think, you can very easily end up thinking the same way. The fact that you don’t see the positive stuff about yourself, or your experiences, doesn’t mean it isn’t there
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Mental filtering is a bias in the way you process information, in which you acknowledge only information that fits with a belief you hold
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    When you hold rigid demands about the way things ‘have got to be’, you have no margin for deviation or error. You leave yourself vulnerable to experiencing exaggerated emotional disturbance when things in life just don’t go your way
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    You believe that you must have the approval of your friends and colleagues. This leads you to feel anxious in many social situations and drives you to try and win everyone’s approval.
    You think that because you try very hard to be kind and considerate to others, they really ought to be just as kind and considerate in return. Because your demand is not realistic – sadly, other people are governed by their own priorities – you often feel hurt about your friends not acting the way you do yourself.
    You believe that you absolutely should never let people down. Therefore, you rarely put your own welfare first
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Accepting yourself as you are is a powerful first step towards self-improvement
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Celebrate complexities. All human beings – yourself included – are unique, multifaceted, and ever-changing
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Strive to avoid labelling yourself, other people, and the world around you
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Give yourself time to allow your feelings to subside
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Ask yourself how you’d view the situation if you were feeling calmer. Look to see if there is any concrete evidence to support your interpretation of your feelings
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    Take notice of thoughts such as ‘I’m feeling nervous, something must be wrong’ and ‘I’m so angry, and that really shows how badly you’ve behaved’, and recognise that feelings are not always the best measure of reality
    Ian Copplehas quoted3 years ago
    When you feel emotional reasoning taking over your thoughts, take a step back and try the following
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