Small Beer Press

Small Beer Press
115Books65Followers
    Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Presslast month
    Who is ready for the fourty-eleventh issue of LCRW? It has stories, poems, a cooking column, & a bonus novel excerpt.
    Cometh the hourcometh the zinebut waitit is writtenthat a zinemust sometimes be delay’dLady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 44, December 2021. Edited by Gavin J. Grant & Kelly Link. Proofreader: Franchesca Viaud. ISSN 1544–7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618732033. Print edition text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413–585–0414). Subscriptions: $24/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions: EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2021 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Mother Cat” © 2021 by Ashley Wong (ashlwong.com). Thank you authors, artists, and readers. Celebrating! Sofia Samatar’s A Stranger in Olondria appearing on NPR’s 50 Favorite SF&F Books of the Past Decade; Kim Scott’s Taboo receiving a Kate Challis Ruth Adeney Koori Award (RAKA) commendation; and Vandana Singh being selected as a Climate Imagination Fellows by ASU’s Center for Science. Petra Mayer, RIP. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above.
    Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press3 months ago
    Punk photographer Cass Neary, “one of noir’s great anti-heroes” (Katherine Dunn, author of Geek Love), rages back in the series that began with the award-winning novels Generation Loss and Available Dark. Fleeing Reykjavik and a cluster of cult murders, Cass lands in London to rendezvous with her longtime lover Quinn, a person of interest to both Interpol and the Russian mob.
    Only Quinn doesn’t show up. Alone in London and fearing the worst, Cass hooks up with a singer-songwriter with her own dark past, who brings her to the wrong party. Cass becomes entangled with the party’s host, Mallo Tierney, an eccentric gangster with a penchant for cigar cutters and neatly-wrapped packages, and a trio of dissolute groupies connected to a notorious underground filmmaker.
    Forced to run Mallo's contraband, Cass is suddenly enmeshed in a web of murder, betrayal, and artistic and sexual obsession that extends from London to the stark beauty of England’s Land’s End Peninsula, where she uncovers an archeological enigma that could change our view of human history―if she survives.
    Strobe-lit against an apocalyptic background of rock and roll, rave culture, fast drugs and transgressive photography, Hard Light continues the breathless, breathtaking saga of Cassandra Neary, “an anti-hero for the ages. We’d follow Cass anywhere, into any glittery abyss, and do.” [Megan Abbot, author of The Fever]
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    There are no ghostly bumps in the night, no loud noises, no cheap shot surprises to knock you out your seat. Instead: stories and poetry — so much excellent poetry! — that knock all the dust off your edges, the pencil off your table, the crown off the monarchy.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    2 x 18. 3 x 12. 4 x 9. 6 x 6. There are many ways to look at or approach the number 36. It is a square and therefore seemingly as far from a prime number as it is possible to get. (37 is a prime: so the previous statement sounds interesting, but is wrong.) There are not 36 short short stories within. But there are at least 2 poems although they are not 18 pages each.

    There is a cover from kAt Philbin.

    There are stories of possibly eerie encounters; stories of regrettable encounters; stories that do not hold a single encounter, except the imminent encounter between you, the reader, and the writer who is somewhere other in space and now retreating further in time each day. And if the enchantment of fiction — and poetry and nonfiction — works as planned, that magic will take someone’s thought that has been encapsulated in words, those words that were encased by ink, that ink that was pinned to paper, and then maybe, just maybe, that magic will be enacted upon you by the act of reading and you will take into your synapses, the space between your synapses, something of what that far distant writer hoped to impart in these words.

    Table of Contents

    Fiction

    Gabriela Santiago, “Children of Air”Lily Davenport, “The Crane Alphabet”T. L. Rodebaugh, “The Secret History of the Original Line”Mollie Chandler, “Evidence of a Storm”Todd Summar, “Watching You Without Me”Laurel Lathrop, “Cunning”Christi Nogle, “The Best of Our Past, the Worst of Our Future”Zhao Haihong, “Windhorse”Nonfiction

    Nicole Kimberling, “How to Cook (Dis)Comfort Food”

    Poetry

    D M Gordon, Two Poems

    About these Authors

    Mollie Chandler is soon to complete her MFA in poetry at Lesley University, where she also concentrates in fantasy, fairy tale, and pedagogy. She works in Boston as an editorial assistant at an educational publishing company. Off the clock, she studies jazz vocals and acting, haunts thrift stores, and hunts for the best diners in New England. Her work can be found or is forthcoming in Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, The Charles River Journal, Light: a Journal of Photography and Poetry, Paradise in Limbo, Poems2Go, and others.
    L. M. Davenport is a first-year MFA candidate at the University of Alabama. She has read Ursula Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness a ridiculous number of times, and once knitted a five-and-a-half-foot-long giant squid. Her work has previously appeared at Hobart, Shimmer, and Luna Station Quarterly.
    D M Gordon is the author of Fourth World and Nightly, at the Institute of the Possible, a finalist for the Massachusetts Book Award and International Book Award. Gordon’s poems and stories have been published widely. Prizes include First Prize from Glimmer Train, and Editor’s Choice Awards from the Beacon Street Review and descant. An MCC Artist Fellow in fiction for a portion of her novel Geography, as well as a two time finalist in poetry, she’s a freelance editor in multiple genres, and the editor for Hedgerow Books.
    Nicole Kimberling lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her wife, Dawn Kimberling. She is a professional cook and amateur life coach. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. She is also the author of the Bellingham Mystery Series.
    Laurel Lathrop is studying fiction in the Creative Writing PhD program at Florida State University, where she has been awarded a Legacy Fellowship. She teaches composition and works as Assistant Nonfiction Editor of the Southeast Review.
    Christi Nogle teaches college writing in Boise, Idaho. She has published in CDM recording studio’s Portable Story Series and the Pseudopod podcast and has a story forthcoming in C. M. Muller’s literary horror anthology Nightscript III.
    T. L. Rodebaugh is a clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. He lives with his wife and two children. When not conducting psychological research or writing fiction, he enjoys being barely competent in playing the guitar and gardening. Although he has published widely in the field of psychology, this is his first published short story.
    Gabriela Santiago grew up in Illinois, Florida, Montana, and Yokosuka, Japan; these days she lives in St. Paul, where she spends her days professionally playing with kids at the Minnesota Children’s Museum. She is a graduate of Macalester College and the Clarion writing workshop, as well as a proud member of Team Tiny Bonesaw. Her fiction has appeared in People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction!, People of Colo(u)r Destroy Horror!, Betwixt, Black Candies—Surveillance: A Journal of Literary Horror, and States of Terror; her Black Candies story is also available in audio form on the GlitterShip podcast. You can find her online on Tumblr or Twitter.
    Todd Summar writes fiction and essays, and serves as an editor for publishers and individuals. His work has appeared in Literary Hub, PANK, and Electric Literature, among others. He is the founding editor of Goreyesque and has an MFA in Creative Writing from Columbia College Chicago. You can learn more about him on toddsummar.com or ToddSummar.
    About
    Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 36 Early Autumn 2017. ISSN 1544–7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731395. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027. Printed at Paradise Copies, 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413–585–0414. Subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through Weightless Bbooks.com &c. Contents © 2017 the authors. Cover illustration “I Was Raised by the Forest” ©2017 by kAt Philbin. All rights reserved. Thank you, lovely authors and artists. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women and writers of color), guideline requests, playlists, &c. to the address above. Peace.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Edward Gauvin provides a taster of his upcoming collection of French author Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud’s lovely, weird stories in “A City of Museums” and Chinese author Haihong Zhao translated her own award winning story, “Exuviation.”Apart from that, this issue contains no manganates, managements, or manatees. Maybe next time.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Emma is spending the summer with her Scottish cousins—who are wonderful material for her attempt to win the School Prize for most interesting holiday diary. The cousins, lofty Andy, reserved Fiona, and fierce Roddy, are experimenting with their grandfather's dilapidated old mini-submarine to see if they can find a monster in the family loch.Emma Tupper's Diary is a sometimes terrifying, sometimes broadly hilarious adventure novel in the spirit of From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler and I Capture the Castle.Praise for Emma Tupper's Diary:“Fish out of water Emma must spend the summer in Scotland with cousins she’s never met. They’re somewhat older and get along fine with minimal adult supervision. Even when they plot to take an old submarine out on the nearby loch for a spin, adding a Nessy-like monster head to the top for fun, there’s no one around to urge caution. It’s the sort of family where everyone is whip-smart, conversations are fast and fascinating, and statements of fact are rarely truthful. All of which makes for one extremely suspenseful and surprisingly thought-provoking adventure.”—Gwenyth Swain (author of Chig and the Second Spread)“One of my favorite childhood books. … Its themes and plot have come around again, and a smart production company should scoop it up for a film adaptation.”—Atomic Librarian“An enthralling book, with fascinating characters, told with humor and wit, and with a story that just might, barely, be possible.”—Book Loons“Comedy of manners? Ecological allegory? Adventure? Farce?”—Kirkus ReviewsPraise for Peter Dickinson's children's books:“One of the real masters of children's literature.”—Philip Pullman“Peter Dickinson is a national treasure.”—The Guardian“Magnificent. Peter Dickinson is the past-master story-teller of our day.”—The Times Literary SupplementPeter Dickinson is the author of over fifty books including Eva, Earth and Air, The Dancing Bear, and the Michael L. Printz honor book The Ropemaker. He has twice received the Crime Writers' Association's Gold Dagger as well as the Guardian Award and Whitbread Prize. He lives in England and is married to the novelist Robin McKinley.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    “Combines the cruel humor of Candide with the allegorical panache of Animal Farm.”—Entertainment Weekly«Carol is the most unappreciated great writer we've got. Carmen Dog ought to be a classic in the colleges by now … It's so funny, and it's so keen.”—Ursula K. Le Guin“A rollicking outre satire…. full of comic leaps and absurdist genius.”—Bitch “A wise and funny book.”—The New York Times«This trenchant feminist fantasy-satire mixes elements of Animal Farm, Rhinoceros and The Handmaid's Tale…. Imagination and absurdist humor mark [Carmen Dog] throughout, and Emshwiller is engaging even when most savage about male-female relationships.”—Booklist“Her fantastic premise allows Emshwiller canny and frequently hilarious insights into the damaging sex-role stereotypes both men and women perpetuate.”—Publishers WeeklyThe debut title in our Peapod Classics line, Carol Emshwiller’s genre-jumping debut novel is a dangerous, sharp-eyed look at men, women, and the world we live in.Everything is changing: women are turning into animals, and animals are turning into women. Pooch, a golden setter, is turning into a beautiful woman—although she still has some of her canine traits: she just can't shuck that loyalty thing—and her former owner has turned into a snapping turtle. When the turtle tries to take a bite of her own baby, Pooch snatches the baby and runs. Meanwhile, there's a dangerous wolverine on the loose, men are desperately trying to figure out what's going on, and Pooch discovers what she really wants: to sing Carmen.Carmen Dog is the funny feminist classic that inspired writers Pat Murphy and Karen Joy Fowler to create the James Tiptree Jr. Memorial Award.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Locus Recommended ReadingWhen Taggert's adopted daughter goes missing he suspects the hand of an old enemy. He gathers friends, family, and even those who don't quite trust that he has left his violent past behind. But their search leads them to an unexpected place, the past, and the consequences of their journey have a price that is higher than they can afford.Praise for The Liminal People:“A great piece of genre fiction. But picking which genre to place it in isn't easy. The first in a planned series, it's got the twists and taut pacing of a thriller, the world-warping expansiveness of a fantasy yarn, and even the love-as-redemption arc of a romance. Oh yeah, a lot of the characters in it have superhuman powers, too.”—The Rumpus“Ayize's imagination will mess with yours, and the world won't ever look quite the same again.”—Nalo Hopkinson“An action-packed thriller and a careful look at the moral dilemmas of those whose powers transcend humanity.”—Publishers WeeklyThe enigmatic quagmire that is Ayize Jama-Everett has been making his presence felt all across this world since 1974. In New York, California, Morocco, Ethiopia, and elsewhere, he has impressed, reviled, and astonished with his amazing feats of mental alacrity and mystical inebriation. Despite being degreed in both divinity and psychology, the forlorn artist stakes his reputation and honor on the calling of author. He is known to be cunning in the ways of the bottle, the pen, and the pistol.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    In an obscure old volume in the British Library, bestselling mystery writer Sarah Smith found an ancient poem. Who wrote it? Ex-English professor Smith writes a snarky and accessible preface that introduces the reader to authorship studies and, with deduction worthy of Sherlock Holmes, she identifies the writer of the poem as the major alternate Shakespeare candidate, Edward de Vere.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Cara's mother is still missing. When her brother Jax texts her from “smart kid's boot camp” in Boston, Cara and her two best friends go to the rescue. But the camp is a front for Cara's mother's organization who are fighting against a force who wants to make the planet over in its own image, which will leave no space for anything else, animal, insect, or human. Lydia Millet is the author of Love in Infant Monkeys and Ghost Lights. She works at an endangered-species protection group. The Shimmers in the Night is the second book in the Dissenters series.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    This book has one problem:it's not nearly long enough. Sure, it's chock full of great stories by the best short fiction writer of his generation, modern classics like “The Ugly Chickens” and “Flying Saucer Rock n Roll” and “Heart of Whitenesse” and many more. Think of it as the best tasting menu in literature. Try this, then go get more.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    With the thirtieth issue, LCRW—the only zine named after Winston Churchill's mother—changes everything. We turn blue into tree. We make electricity solid. We publish stories that shake the world so hard it takes a left at Albuquerque and is never seen again. Fiction! Poetry! Dancing in the aisles. Chocolate is distributed in the streets. The world sighs, is remade.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    After issue no. 25, NewPages said, “More, more, more please.” SF Revu suggested, “If you want to support some very wonderful fiction, than subscribe to LCRW.” So eventually we made another issue: Eight stories: dread pirate ships, dread submersibles, dread sheds! Alice, Three-Hat Juan, and welders in love. Ted Chiang on folk biology. And that cover!
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    “I think Peter Dickinson is hands down the best stylist as a writer and the most interesting storyteller in my genre.”—Sara Paretsky, author of BreakdownPraise for The Poison Oracle:“I have no idea if any of this talk and ac-tion is authentic, and I don't care. Either way it's marvellous.”—Rex Stout“Intelligent, elegantly written . . . a thoroughly enjoyable read.”—Sunday TimesPraise for Peter Dickinson's mysteries:“He is the true original, a superb writer who revitalises the traditions of the mystery genre . . . incapable of writing a trite or inelegant sentence . . . a mas-ter.”—P. D. James“Consummate storytelling skill.”—Peter LoveseyTake a medieval Arab kingdom, add a ruler who wants to update the kingdom's educational facilities, include an English research psycholinguist (an Oxford classmate of the ruler) invited to pursue his work on animal communication, and then add a touch of chaos in Dinah, a chimpanzee who has begun to learn to form coherent sentences with plastic symbols. When a murder is committed in the oil-rich marshes, Dinah is the only witness, and Morris has to go into the marshes to dis-cover the truth. The Poison Oracle is a novel of its time that exposes in the everyday language people use humanity's thinking and unthinking cruelties to one another and to the animals with whom we share this earth.Peter Dickinson has twice received the Crime Writers' Association's Gold Dagger. His novels include Death of a Unicorn, A Summer in the Twenties, and many more. He lives in England and is married to the novelist Robin McKinley.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Praise for Peter Dickinson's mysteries: “A literary magician controlling an appar-ently inexhaustible supply of effects.”—Penelope Lively For best-selling author Lady Margaret, the past is no longer a pleasant memory. Her first lover's mysterious death and the seeming inevitability of her inheriting the family's stately home are cast in new light by secrets unwillingly revisited. The first in a series of reprints of Peter Dickinson's mysteries, this classic British mystery will win fans currently engrossed in Downton Ab-bey. Peter Dickinson has twice received the Crime Writers' As-sociation's Gold Dagger. He lives in England and is married to the novelist Robin McKinley.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Cara's mother has disappeared. Her father isn't talking about it. Her big brother Max is hiding behind his iPod, and her genius little brother Jackson is busy studying the creatures he collects from the beach. But when a watery specter begins to haunt the family's Cape Cod home, Cara and her brothers realize that their scientist mother may not be who they thought she was—and that the world has much stranger, much older inhabitants than they had imagined.With help from Cara's best friend Hayley, the three embark on a quest that will lead them from the Cape's hidden, ancient places to a shipwreck at the bottom of the sea. They're soon on the front lines of an ancient battle between good and evil, with the terrifying “pouring man” close on their heels.Packed with memorable characters and thrilling imagery, Lydia Millet weaves a page-turning adventure even as she brings the seaside world of Cape Cod to magical life. The first in a series of books about the Sykes children, The Fires Beneath the Sea is a rip-cracking middle-grade novel that will make perfect beach reading—for readers of any age!Lydia Millet is the author of six previous novels, including My Happy Life, which won the 2003 PEN-USA Award for Fiction, and Oh Pure and Radiant Heart, which was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. Her short story collection Love in Infant Monkeys was a 2010 Pulitzer Prize finalist.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    “Couch hits on an improbable, even fantastic premise, and then rigorously hews to the logic that it generates, keeping it afloat (at times literally) to the end.”—Los Angeles Times“Delightfully lighthearted writing. … Occasionally laugh-out-loud funny, the enthusiastic prose carries readers through sporadic dark moments … Parzybok’s quirky humor recalls the flaws and successes of early Douglas Adams.”—Publishers Weekly“The book succeeds as a conceptual art piece, a literary travelogue, and a fantastical quest.”—Willamette Week“Hundreds of writers have slavishly imitated—or outright ripped off—Tolkien in ways that connoisseurs of other genres would consider shameless. What Parzybok has done here in adapting the same old song to a world more familiar to the reader is to revive the genre and make it relevant again”—The StrangerA Spring Summer Indie Next Reading List Pick: Top 10 Reading Group Suggestions«Couch follows the quirky journey of Thom, Erik, and Tree as they venture into the unknown at the behest of a magical, orange couch, which has its own plan for their previously boring lives. Parzybok's colorful characters, striking humor, and eccentric magical realism offer up an adventuresome read.”—Christian Crider, Inkwood Books, Tampa, FLA January 2009 Indie Next List Pick“This funny novel of furniture moving gone awry is a magical realism quest for modern times. Parzybok's touching story explores the aimlessness of our culture, a society of jobs instead of callings, replete with opportunities and choices but without the philosophies and vocations we need to make meaningful decisions.”—Josh Cook, Porter Square Books, Cambridge, MA«A lot of people are looking for magic in the world today, but only Benjamin Parzybok thought to check the sofa, which is, I think, the place it’s most likely to be found. Couch is a slacker epic: a gentle, funny book that ambles merrily from Coupland to Tolkien, and gives couch-surfing (among other things) a whole new meaning.”—Paul La Farge“One of the strangest road novels you'll ever read. It's a funny and fun book, and it's also a very smart book. Fans of Tom Robbins or Christopher Moore should enjoy this.”—Handee Books“It is an upholstered Odyssey unlike any other you are likely to read. It is funny, confusing in places, wild and anarchic. It is part Quixote, part Murakami, part Tom Robbins, part DFS showroom. It has cult hit written all over it.”—Scott, Me and My Big MouthBenjamin Parzybok on tour: http://booktour.com/author/benjamin_parzybokIn this exuberant and hilarious debut reminiscent of The Life of Pi and Then We Came to the End, an episode of furniture moving gone awry becomes an impromptu quest of self-discovery, secret histories, and unexpected revelations.Thom is a computer geek whose hacking of a certain Washington-based software giant has won him a little fame but few job prospects. Erik is a smalltime con man, a fast-talker who is never quite quick enough on his feet. Their roommate, Tree, is a confused clairvoyant whose dreams and prophecies may not be completely off base. After a freak accident fl oods their apartment, the three are evicted—but they have to take their couch with them. The real problem? The couch—huge and orange—won’t let them put it down. Soon the three roommates are on a cross-country trek along back roads, byways, and rail lines, heading far out of Portland and deep into one very weird corner of the American dream.Benjamin Parzybok is the creator of Gumball Poetry, a journal published through gumball machines, and the Black Magic Insurance Agency, a city-wide mystery/treasure hunt. He has worked as a congressional page, a ghostwriter for the governor of Washington, a web developer, a Taiwanese factory technical writer, an asbestos removal janitor, and a potato sorter. He lives in Portland, Oregon, with the writer Laura Moulton and their two children.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    “The impish love child of Tutuola and Marquez. Utterly delightful.”—Nalo Hopkinson
    “This is one of those literary works of which it can be said that not a word should be changed.” —Booklist, Starred Revew
    Karen Lord’s debut novel won the prestigious Frank Collymore Literary Prize in Barbados, the Mythopeic, Carl Brandon Parallax, and Crawford Awards. It is an intricately woven tale of adventure, magic, and the power of the human spirit.Paama’s husband is a fool and a glutton. Bad enough that he followed her to her parents’ home in the village of Makende, now he’s disgraced himself by murdering livestock and stealing corn. When Paama leaves him for good, she attracts the attention of the undying ones—the djombi—who present her with a gift: the Chaos Stick, which allows her to manipulate the subtle forces of the world. Unfortunately, a wrathful djombi with indigo skin believes this power should be his and his alone.Bursting with humor and rich in fantastic detail, Redemption in Indigo is a clever, contemporary fairy tale that introduces readers to a dynamic new voice in Caribbean literature. Lord’s world of spider tricksters and indigo immortals, inspired in part by a Senegalese folk tale, will feel instantly familiar—but Paama’s adventures are fresh, surprising, and utterly original.“Fantasy as a genre does not have boundaries,” writes Lord. «It has roots. You may call it fantasy. I call it life.”
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    Selected as one of the Best Books of the Year in science fiction and fantasy by Amazon.com.Delving deeper into the genre-spanning territory explored in Interfictions, the Interstitial Arts Foundation’s first groundbreaking anthology, Interfictions 2 showcases twenty-one original and innovative writers. It includes contributions from authors from six countries, including the United States, Poland, Norway, Australia, France, and Great Britain.Newcomers such as Alaya Dawn Johnson, Theodora Goss, and Alan DeNiro rub shoulders with established visionaries such as Jeffrey Ford (The Drowned Life), Brian Francis Slattery (Liberation), Nin Andrews (The Book of Orgasms), and M. Rickert (Map of Dreams). Also featured are works by Will Ludwigsen, Cecil Castellucci, Ray Vukcevich, Carlos Hernandez, Lavie Tidhar, Elizabeth Ziemska, Peter M. Ball, Camilla Bruce, Amelia Beamer, William Alexander, Shira Lipkin, Lionel Davoust, Stephanie Shaw, and David J. Schwartz.Colleen Mondor, of the well-known blog Chasing Ray, interviews the editors for the afterword.Henry Jenkins, ex-director of MIT’s Comparative Media Studies program and now a member of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and School of Cinematic Arts, provides a fantastic introduction sure to set readers’ imaginations alight.Interfictions 2 is here and ready to be read, discussed, taught, blogged, taken apart, and re-interpreted.Delia Sherman was born in Tokyo, Japan, and brought up in New York City. She earned a PhD in Renaissance Studies at Brown University and taught at Boston University and Northeastern University. She is the author of the novels Through a Brazen Mirror, The Porcelain Dove, Changeling, and The Magic Mirror of the Mermaid Queen. A co-founder of the Interstitial Arts Foundation, she lives in New York City.Christopher Barzak is the author of the novels One for Sorrow and The Love We Share Without Knowing. His stories have appeared in Nerve.com, Pindeldyboz, Strange Horizons, Descant, and the first volume of Interfictions. He teaches writing at Youngstown State University.
  • Small Beer Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall Beer Press4 months ago
    “Beautifully written.”—Publishers Weekly, starred reviewThe martial Sainnites have occupied Shaftal for fifteen years. Every year the cost of resistance rises. Emil, an officer and scholar; Zanja, a diplomat and last survivor of her people; and Karis, a metalsmith, half-blood giant, and an addict, can only watch as their country falls into lawlessness and famine. Together, perhaps they can change the course of history.Laurie J. Marks' first two Elemental Logic novels (Fire Logic and Earth Logic) both won the Gaylactic Spectrum Award and received multiple starred reviews. She lives in Boston, Massachusetts, and teaches at the University of Massachusetts.
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)