Adam Smith

The Wealth of Nations

Fifa Bouhas quotedlast year
what is the work of one man, in a rude state of society, being generally that of several in an improved one
Bolotbek Nurlanbekhas quoted2 years ago
This great increase in the quantity of work, which, in consequence of the division of labour, the same number of people are capable of performing, is owing to three different circumstances; first, to the increase of dexterity in every particular workman; secondly, to the saving of the time which is commonly lost in passing from one species of work to another; and, lastly, to the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labour, and enable one man to do the work of many.
Bolotbek Nurlanbekhas quoted2 years ago
In agriculture, the labour of the rich country is not always much more productive than that of the poor; or, at least, it is never so much more productive, as it commonly is in manufactures.
eadyidihhas quoted3 years ago
the nation will be better or worse supplied with all the necessaries and conveniencies for which it has occasion.
eadyidihhas quoted3 years ago
that of those who are not so employed
eadyidihhas quoted3 years ago
the soil, climate, or extent of territory of any particular nation, the abundance or scantiness of its annual supply must, in that particular situation, depend upon those two circumstances.
eadyidihhas quoted3 years ago
secondly, by the proportion between the number of those who are employed in useful labour, and
eadyidihhas quoted3 years ago
first, by the skill, dexterity, and judgment with which its labour is generally applied
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
The whole quantity, therefore, of the cheap commodity, must commonly be greater in proportion to the whole quantity of the dear one, than the value of a certain quantity of the dear one, is to the value of an equal quantity of the cheap one.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
It does not cost less labour to bring silver to Amsterdam than to Dantzic; but it costs a great deal more to bring corn. The real cost of silver must be nearly the same in both places; but that of corn must be very different.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
though the metals naturally fly from the worse to the better market, yet it may be difficult to transport them in such quantities as to bring their price nearly to a level in both.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
After food, clothing and lodging are the two great wants of mankind.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
The pretence that corporations are necessary for the better government of the trade, is without any foundation.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
A regulation which enables those of the same trade to tax themselves, in order to provide for their poor, their sick, their widows and orphans, by giving them a common interest to manage, renders such assemblies necessary.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
First, the agreeableness or disagreeableness of the employments themselves; secondly, the easiness and cheapness, or the difficulty and expense of learning them; thirdly, the constancy or inconstancy of employment in them; fourthly, the small or great trust which must be reposed in those who exercise them; and, fifthly, the probability or improbability of success in them.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
It is there unfashionable not to be a man of business.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
When you have got a little, it is often easy to get more. The great difficulty is to get that little.
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
The increase in the wages of labour necessarily increases the price of many commodities
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
The price of monopoly is upon every occasion the highest which can be got. The natural price, or the price of free competition, on the contrary, is the lowest which can be taken
Victor Hansenhas quoted3 years ago
his labour, from his stock, or from his land.
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