Edward Denison

30-Second Architecture

    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Besides the most famous example of biomimetics, Velcro (in imitation of the burrs of the burdock plant), is the recent and award-winning kinetic façade of the Al Bahar Towers by Aedas (2012) in Abu Dhabi.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Adaptive Reuse Alternative name for Creative Reuse, in which, rather than being demolished, a building is reused by being converted from one purpose to another.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    The term Baroque describes the exuberant architectural and sculptural styles of the 17th–18th centuries, where formalism became replaced by freer expression and experimentation.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Other communication devices are the use of historical references, often in irony or as parody, and a reliance on the façade to communicate with no reference to a building’s internal layout. Seminal Postmodern works include Michael Graves’s Portland Building, Portland, Oregon (1982), Philip Johnson’s AT&T Building, New York (1984) and James Stirling’s Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart (1984). The New Urbanism of Leon Krier at Seaside, Florida, and Poundbury, in Dorset, are also considered Postmodern.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    The Nakagin Capsule Tower is a rare example of built Metabolist architecture. Its prefabricated capsules fitted to a permanent core were intended to be reconfigured or replaced over time.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Metabolism was a Japanese movement that envisioned cities as living organisms, comprising elements with different metabolic cycles that transformed over time.
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    The term ‘Organic Architecture’ was coined by Frank Lloyd Wright to describe his approach to buildings as organisms with all-inclusive designs, where every element – from layout and technical details to windows, ornamentation to furniture – relates to every other.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    The most celebrated examples of Arts & Crafts architecture are domestic homes, which were organized around a communal core – the hearth and inglenook, a semi-enclosed seating area around a fireplace. The interiors appear casual and comfortable, and the building and furniture demonstrate the handcrafting of the materials used.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    In the 19th century, the choice of styles turned into a veritable battle when A. W. N. Pugin ascribed the Gothic with superior moral and religious ideals derived from a romantic interpretation of medieval life.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    The term ‘Paper Architecture’ can be applied to Utopian, unbuildable or otherwise imaginary structures, generally conceived to explore an architectural thesis or cultural/political position.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Born in Boston, Louis Henry Sullivan would become forever associated with the thrusting, muscular architecture of Chicago. Known now as one of the founding fathers both of the skyscraper and of Modernism, he coined the phrase branded onto the heart of every modern architect: ‘form follows function.’
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Solid–void theory works on the concept that what the architect designs is as much the (solid) mass of a building as the (void) spaces surrounding and enveloping it.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    truth to materials A principle of Modernist architecture, in which the materials of a building’s construction are not hidden or disguised.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    More than a movement or style in art and architecture, Constructivism was a whole aesthetic. Finding its widest expression in the early years of the USSR, in the 1920s and early 1930s it was the dominant style for Soviet public architecture, displaying a utilitarian simplicity and respect for materials.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Le Corbusier has been blamed for the blight of grim, alienating tower bocks all over northern Europe – although his supporters argue that his ideas have been misunderstood and misappropriated. However, he was without question also capable of reaching the sublime, which he did most effectively in the chapel of Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    The 16th-century Italian architect Palladio took ideas of symmetry to an extreme, notably in his Villa Capra (1560): each of its four façades is identical, and the plan of the building (a small circle within a larger square) is entirely symmetrical either side of both axes.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    In The Projective Cast (1995), architect and historian Robin Evans suggested that the reliance on orthographic drawing, including the elevation, has promoted the prevalence of rectangular shapes in buildings.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    The section is a drawing produced from an imaginary, usually vertical, cut through a structure, revealing its outline and the interior visible behind the cut.
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
    Raumplan Adolf Loos’s (1870–1933) ‘space plan’, in which he put the design emphasis on individual rooms according to purpose, rather than for rooms to be squeezed into predetermined and restrictive floors. As he said, ‘My architecture is not conceived in plans but in spaces … For me there is no ground floor, first floor … Storeys merge and spaces relate to each other.’
    ☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted3 years ago
    The flying buttress – detached from the wall and connected to it by an arch – was a key innovation that occurred at the end of the Romanesque and beginning of the Gothic periods. To add greater vertical thrust, the flying buttress is often capped with a heavy load above the arch called a pinnacle, and the history of Gothic architecture is, in part, the history of increasingly spectacular and daring uses of the flying buttress and decoration of the pinnacle.
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