Dan Ariely

Predictably Irrational

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Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
As the author and journalist Upton Sinclair once noted, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
Sigmund Freud explained it this way. He said that as we grow up in society, we internalize the social virtues. This internalization leads to the development of the superego. In general, the superego is pleased when we comply with society's ethics, and unhappy when we don't
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
When stripping away our preconceptions and our previous knowledge is not possible, perhaps we can at least acknowledge that we are all biased. If we acknowledge that we are trapped within our perspective, which partially blinds us to the truth, we may be able to accept the idea that conflicts generally require a neutral third party—who has not been tainted with our expectations—to set down the rules and regulations. Of course, accepting the word of a third party is not easy and not always possible; but when it is possible, it can yield substantial benefits. And for that reason alone, we must continue to try
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
These results show that even our own behavior can be influenced by our stereotypes, and that activation of stereotypes can depend on our current state of mind and how we view ourselves at the moment
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
WHEN WE BELIEVE beforehand that something will be good, therefore, it generally will be good—and when we think it will be bad, it will bad.
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
Instead of focusing the attention of the teachers, parents, and kids on test scores, salaries, and competition, it might be better to instill in all of us a sense of purpose, mission, and pride in education
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
SO WE LIVE in two worlds: one characterized by social exchanges and the other characterized by market exchanges. And we apply different norms to these two kinds of relationships
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
Yes, a free market based on supply, demand, and no friction would be the ideal if we were truly rational. Yet when we are not rational but irrational, policies should take this important factor into account
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
In other words, the sensitivity we show to price changes might in fact be largely a result of our memory for the prices we have paid in the past and our desire for coherence with our past decisions—not at all a reflection of our true preferences or our level of demand
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
When we face such a decision, it might seem to us that this is just one decision, without large consequences; but in fact the power of the first decision can have such a long-lasting effect that it will percolate into our future decisions for years to come
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
That our first decisions resonate over a long sequence of decisions
Nicolas Palacioshas quoted3 months ago
But there's one aspect of relativity that consistently trips us up. It's this: we not only tend to compare things with one another but also tend to focus on comparing things that are easily comparable—and avoid comparing things that cannot be compared easily
Oksana Korostelhas quotedlast year
That's a lesson we can all learn: the more we have, the more we want. And the only cure is to break the cycle of relativity.
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