Niccolò Machiavelli

The Prince

b7107009067has quoted4 years ago
you wish to please me, and to bring success and honour to yourself, do right and study, because others will help you if you help yourself."
Aida Shareepkhanhas quotedlast year
prince who re­lies en­tirely on for­tune is lost when it changes
Haffizah Yasminahas quoted2 years ago
Men will not look at things as they really are, but as they wish them to be—and are ruined
David Alejandrohas quoted4 years ago
Men will not look at things as they really are, but as they wish them to be—and are ruined
CENDRAWATIhas quoted6 years ago
For he who innovates will have for his enemies all those who are well off under the existing order of things, and only lukewarm supporters in those who might be better off under the new. This lukewarm temper arises partly from the fear of adversaries who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of mankind, who will never admit the merit of anything new, until they have seen it proved by the event.
Ahmad Hoseinihas quoted20 days ago
to un­der­stand that of princes it needs to be of the people.
Ahmad Hoseinihas quoted20 days ago
the truth of the mat­ter and the weight­i­ness of the theme shall make it ac­cept­able.
Tamilla Ibragimovahas quotedlast month
con­quer­ors
Naomi Jagessarhas quoted3 months ago
There­fore, my son, if you wish to please me, and to bring suc­cess and hon­our to your­self, do right and study, be­cause oth­ers will help you if you help your­self.”
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
who has not first laid his found­a­tions may be able with great abil­ity to lay them af­ter­wards
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
Besides the reas­ons men­tioned, the nature of the people is vari­able, and whilst it is easy to per­suade them, it is dif­fi­cult to fix them in that per­sua­sion.
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
the in­credu­lity of men, who do not read­ily be­lieve in new things un­til they have had a long ex­per­i­ence of them.
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
Without that op­por­tun­ity their powers of mind would have been ex­tin­guished, and without those powers the op­por­tun­ity would have come in vain
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
Never­the­less, he who has re­lied least on for­tune is es­tab­lished the strongest.
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
be­cause men, walk­ing al­most al­ways in paths beaten by oth­ers, and fol­low­ing by im­it­a­tion their deeds, are yet un­able to keep en­tirely to the ways of oth­ers or at­tain to the power of those they im­it­ate
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
And he who be­comes mas­ter of a city ac­cus­tomed to free­dom and does not des­troy it, may ex­pect to be des­troyed by it, for in re­bel­lion it has al­ways the watch­word of liberty and its an­cient priv­ileges as a ral­ly­ing point, which neither time nor be­ne­fits will ever cause it to for­get
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
Whenever those states which have been ac­quired as stated have been ac­cus­tomed to live un­der their own laws and in free­dom, there are three courses for those who wish to hold them: the first is to ruin them, the next is to reside there in per­son, the third is to per­mit them to live un­der their own laws, draw­ing a trib­ute, and es­tab­lish­ing within it an ol­ig­archy which will keep it friendly to you.
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
be­cause that pre­dom­in­ancy has been brought about either by as­tute­ness or else by force, and both are dis­trus­ted by him who has been raised to power.
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
men change their rulers will­ingly, hop­ing to bet­ter them­selves, and this hope in­duces them to take up arms against him who rules: wherein they are de­ceived, be­cause they af­ter­wards find by ex­per­i­ence they have gone from bad to worse.
Nefeli Kavounihas quoted3 months ago
for one change al­ways leaves the tooth­ing for an­other.
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