Mark Twain

The Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    Well, I may as well con­fess, though I do feel ashamed when I think of it: I was be­gin­ning to have a base han­ker­ing to be its first pres­i­dent my­self. Yes, there was more or less hu­man na­ture in me; I found that out.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    Words are only painted fire; a look is the fire it­self.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    The fact is, the king was a good deal more than a king, he was a man; and when a man is a man, you can’t knock it out of him.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    Dear, dear, it only shows that there is noth­ing di­viner about a king than there is about a tramp, af­ter all. He is just a cheap and hol­low ar­ti­fi­cial­ity when you don’t know he is a king. But re­veal his qual­ity, and dear me it takes your very breath away to look at him. I reckon we are all fools. Born so, no doubt.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    When the spirit of prophecy comes upon you, you merely take your in­tel­lect and lay it off in a cool place for a rest, and un­ship your jaw and leave it alone; it will work it­self: the re­sult is prophecy.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    Old habit of mind is one of the tough­est things to get away from in the world.
    b0854703841has quoted2 years ago
    and how old, old, un­speak­ably old and faded and dry and musty and an­cient he came to look as he went on!
    b0854703841has quoted2 years ago
    his can­did sim­plic­ity,
    b0854703841has quoted2 years ago
    That the ex­ec­u­tive head of a na­tion should be a per­son of lofty char­ac­ter
    b0854703841has quoted2 years ago
    ques­tion as to whether
    b0854703841has quoted2 years ago
    One is quite jus­ti­fied in in­fer­ring
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    The coun­try is the real thing, the sub­stan­tial thing, the eter­nal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; in­sti­tu­tions are ex­tra­ne­ous, they are its mere cloth­ing, and cloth­ing can wear out, be­come ragged, cease to be com­fort­able, cease to pro­tect the body from win­ter, dis­ease, and death.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    But that is the way we are made: we don’t rea­son, where we feel; we just feel.
    Veronika Usachevahas quoted2 years ago
    was so tired that even my fears were not able to keep me awake long.
    Maruska Marianahas quoted2 years ago
    “If it is a command, I will come, but my lord the king knows that I am where the laws of combat require me to remain while any desire to come against me.”
    I waited. Nobody challenged. Then I said:
    “If there are any who doubt that this field is well and fairly won, I do not wait for them to challenge me, I challenge them.”
    Maruska Marianahas quoted2 years ago
    It was an even bet that Clarence had procured that favor for
    Лилия Зайцеваhas quoted2 years ago
    It re­minded me of a time thir­teen cen­turies away, when the “poor whites” of our South who were al­ways de­spised and fre­quently in­sulted by the slave-lords around them, and who owed their base con­di­tion sim­ply to the pres­ence of slav­ery in their midst, were yet pusil­lan­i­mously ready to side with the slave-lords in all po­lit­i­cal moves for the up­hold­ing and per­pet­u­at­ing of slav­ery, and did also fi­nally shoul­der their mus­kets and pour out their lives in an ef­fort to pre­vent the de­struc­tion of that very in­sti­tu­tion which de­graded them.
    Лилия Зайцеваhas quoted3 years ago
    Take a jack­ass, for in­stance: a jack­ass has that kind of strength, and puts it to a use­ful pur­pose, and is valu­able to this world be­cause he is a jack­ass; but a no­ble­man is not valu­able be­cause he is a jack­ass.
    Лилия Зайцеваhas quoted3 years ago
    The coun­try is the real thing, the sub­stan­tial thing, the eter­nal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; in­sti­tu­tions are ex­tra­ne­ous, they are its mere cloth­ing, and cloth­ing can wear out, be­come ragged, cease to be com­fort­able, cease to pro­tect the body from win­ter, dis­ease, and death. To be loyal to rags, to shout for rags, to wor­ship rags, to die for rags—that is a loy­alty of un­rea­son, it is pure an­i­mal; it be­longs to monar­chy, was in­vented by monar­chy; let monar­chy keep it.
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