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David Hume

An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

Соня Верхотуроваhas quoted2 years ago
All reasonings concerning matter of fact seem to be founded on the relation of Cause and Effect.
Соня Верхотуроваhas quoted2 years ago
to enquire what is the nature of that evidence which assures us of any real existence and matter of fact, beyond the present testimony of our senses, or the records of our memo
Соня Верхотуроваhas quoted2 years ago
discoverable by the mere operation of thoug
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
If you assert, therefore, that the understanding of the child is led into this conclusion by any process of argument or ratiocination, I may justly require you to produce that argument; nor have you any pretence to refuse so equitable a demand.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
As nature has taught us the use of our limbs, without giving us the knowledge of the muscles and nerves, by which they are actuated; so has she implanted in us an instinct, which carries forward the thought in a correspondent course to that which she has established among external objects; though we are ignorant of those powers and forces, on which this regular course and succession of objects totally depends
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
Hence we may discover the reason why no philosopher, who is rational and modest, has ever pretended to assign the ultimate cause of any natural operation, or to show distinctly the action of that power, which produces any single effect in the universe
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
This proposition, that causes and effects are discoverable, not by reason but by experience, will readily be admitted with regard to such objects, as we remember to have once been altogether unknown to us; since we must be conscious of the utter inability, which we then lay under, of foretelling what would arise from them
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
This proposition, that causes and effects are discoverable, not by reason but by experience, will readily be admitted with regard to such objects, as we remember to have once been altogether unknown to us; since we must be conscious of the utter inability, which we then lay under, of foretelling what would arise from them. Present
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
This proposition, that causes and effects are discoverable, not by reason but by experience, will readily be admitted with regard to such objects, as we remember to have once been altogether unknown to us; since we must be conscious of the utter inability, which we then lay under, of foretelling what would arise from them.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
effects are discoverable, not by reason but by experience, will readily be admitted with regard to such objects, as we remember to have once been altogether unknown to us; since we must be conscious of the utter inability, which we then lay under, of foretelling what would arise from them
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
Adam, though his rational faculties be supposed, at the very first, entirely perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity and transparency of water that it would suffocate him, or from the light and warmth of fire that it would consume him.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
I shall venture to affirm, as a general proposition, which admits of no exception, that the knowledge of this relation is not, in any instance, attained by reasonings a priori; but arises entirely from experience, when we find that any particular objects are constantly conjoined with each othe
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
That these principles serve to connect ideas will not, I believe, be much doubted. A picture naturally leads our thoughts to the original2: the mention of one apartment in a building naturally introduces an enquiry or discourse concerning the others3: and if we think of a wound, we can scarcely forbear reflecting on the pain which follows it4.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
A man of mild manners can form no idea of inveterate revenge or cruelty; nor can a selfish heart easily conceive the heights of friendship and generosity
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
A Laplander or Negro has no notion of the relish of wine.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
If it happen, from a defect of the organ, that a man is not susceptible of any species of sensation, we always find that he is as little susceptible of the correspondent ideas. A b
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
blind man can form no notion of colours; a deaf man of sounds.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
by producing that idea, which, in their opinion, is not derived from this source.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
When we entertain, therefore, any suspicion that a philosophical term is employed without any meaning or idea (as is but too frequent), we need but enquire, from what impression is that supposed idea derived? And if it be impossible to assign any, this will serve to confirm our suspicion.
Eva Maria Østergaard Frederiksenhas quoted2 years ago
And impressions are distinguished from ideas, which are the less lively perceptions, of which we are conscious, when we reflect on any of those sensations or movements above mentioned.
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