Friedrich Nietzsche

Beyond Good and Evil

b9050517134has quoted4 years ago
He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.
josuedr11has quoted4 years ago
Insanity in individuals is something rare—but in groups, parties, nations, and epochs it is the rule.
josuedr11has quoted4 years ago
He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.
josuedr11has quoted4 years ago
Dreadful experiences raise the question whether he who experiences them is not something dreadful also.
b2024409543has quoted17 days ago
con­vic­tion” of the philo­sopher ap­pears on the scene
b2024409543has quoted17 days ago
per­haps out of rage and am­bi­tious envy of Plato, who knows
b2024409543has quoted17 days ago
He, the old school­teacher of Samos, who sat con­cealed in his little garden at Athens, and wrote three hun­dred books
b2024409543has quoted17 days ago
How ma­li­cious philo­soph­ers can be!
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
taste which seems to deny suf­fer­ing. The skep­ti­cism with re­gard to suf­fer­ing, fun­da­ment­ally only an at­ti­tude of ar­is­to­cratic mor­al­ity, was not the least of the causes, also, of the last great slave-in­sur­rec­tion which began with the French Re­volu­tion.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
En­light­en­ment” causes re­volt, for the slave de­sires the un­con­di­tioned, he un­der­stands noth­ing but the tyr­an­nous, even in mor­als, he loves as he hates, without nu­ance, to the very depths, to the point of pain, to the point of sick­ness—his many hid­den suf­fer­ings make him re­volt against the noble
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
free­thinkers,” and whatever these hon­est ad­voc­ates of “mod­ern ideas” like to call them­selves.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
But a curi­os­ity like mine is once for all the most agree­able of vices—par­don me! I mean to say that the love of truth has its re­ward in heaven, and already upon earth.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
Bey­ond Good and Evil,” with which we at least avoid con­fu­sion, we are some­thing else than “libres-pen­seurs,” “liben pensatori” “free
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
now un­der ob­lig­a­tion to dis­trust­ful­ness, to the wick­ed­est squint­ing out of every abyss of sus­pi­cion.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
The ques­tion is ul­ti­mately whether we really re­cog­nize the will as op­er­at­ing, whether we be­lieve in the caus­al­ity of the will; if we do so—and fun­da­ment­ally our be­lief in this is just our be­lief in caus­al­ity it­self—we must make the at­tempt to posit hy­po­thet­ic­ally the caus­al­ity of the will as the only caus­al­ity.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
It can­not be helped: the sen­ti­ment of sur­render, of sac­ri­fice for one’s neigh­bour, and all self-re­nun­ci­ation-mor­al­ity, must be mer­ci­lessly called to ac­count, and brought to judg­ment; just as the aes­thet­ics of “dis­in­ter­ested con­tem­pla­tion,” un­der which the emas­cu­la­tion of art nowadays seeks in­si­di­ously enough to cre­ate it­self a good con­science.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
the er­ro­neous­ness of the world in which we think we live is the surest and most cer­tain thing our eyes can light upon: we find proof after proof thereof, which would fain al­lure us into sur­mises con­cern­ing a de­cept­ive prin­ciple in the “nature of things.”
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
L’ef­fet c’est moi.
crunchy cheerioshas quoted18 days ago
“la re­li­gion de la souf­france hu­maine”; that is its “good taste.”
b2024409543has quotedlast month
For every im­pulse is im­per­i­ous
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